August 14: Youm-e-Azadi

On 14 August 1947, Pakistan gained its independence. India would gain its independence the following day. Pakistan translates to “pious homeland.”

To observe Youm-e-Azadi (یوم آزادی or Pakistani Independence Day) citizens typically wear green and white; the colors of the national flag. Flag raising ceremonies are held throughout the country and patriotic parades and other events are held.

Pakistan can trace its history back to the Indus Valley civilization which dates to 3,000 BCE. Later, the area was invaded by the Persians, Greeks, Scythians, Arabs, Afghans, and Turks. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Pakistan was part of the Mughal Empire. The Indian subcontinent was then a colony of the British Empire from 1849-1947.

Religious conflict was an important part of the development of Pakistan. Conflicts between the Hindus and Muslims resulted in the development of a two country philosophy that resulted in the creation of Hindu India and Muslim Pakistan. However, conflict between the eastern and western sections of Pakistan resulted in the creation of Bangladesh in 1971.

This year, Pakistan Independence Day will be celebrated during the holy month of Ramadan; a month during which Muslims fast from sun up to sun down. After maghrib salat (prayer after sunset) the fast is typically broken by eating dates.

In 2010, Kinza included a Pakistani Independence Day menu as part of “Independence Day Iftari” which was published in the DesiGrub blog. The blog includes photographs and descriptions of the food on the menu.

Appetizers
Kajoor (dates)
Keema samosas (shaped like dumplings)
Aloo samosas
Chaana chaat
Vegetable Pakoras – Eggplant and Zucchini

Entrée
Palak Paneer
Lamb Korma
Chicken Biryani
Chicken Jalfrezie

Dessert
Pineapple cupcakes with cream cheese icing
Chai
Roofza with milk
Roofza with water

 –Steven L. Berg, PhD

 

5 Responses

  1. jyoti kaur says:

    I find Pakistanis eating habits to be very interesting. Within Pakistan, cuisine varies greatly from region to region, reflecting the country’s ethnic and cultural diversity. It can be highly seasoned and spicy, which is characteristic of the flavors of the South Asian region. Since Muslims are forbidden to eat pork or consume alcohol, halal dietary guidelines are strictly observed. Pakistanis focus on other types of meats such as beef, lamb, chicken, fish and vegetables as well as traditional fruit and dairy. Pakistanis generally eat three meals a day: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. During the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, the eating patterns change to: sehri and iftar. However, given the diversity of the people of Pakistan, cuisines generally differ from home to home.
    – jyoti kaur

    • Olivia Reed says:

      I don’t think I’ve ever really tried any Pakistani food, but this got me looking into it a little bit. Since spices used tend to be relatively important in distinguishing the cuisine of one country from another, I looked into which spices are commonly used in Pakistani cuisine. Black pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, bay leaves, mace, cumin, cardamom, coriander, turmeric, and chili powder are some of the spices that are used in many of the dishes. I found this interesting, as many of these spices, most noteably cinnamon, cloves, coriander, nutmeg, and cardamom are also commonly used in Finnish cuisine. From the reading I’ve done about Pakistani food, it doesn’t seem particularly similar to Finnish food, and I’d imagine that the flavours of the different dishes would be pretty different. I’ve never really done too much thinking about spices, but this gave me an interesting view of their versatility. I also think I’m going to have to try making some Pakistani food sometime in the near future…

  2. Haroon Chaudhary says:

    Pakistan got its independence after hard work of it leader, and sacrifice of the people who can still be found in the history books. The country is based on 4 different regions which mostly speak 4 different languages. The most amount of work was done by the leader behind Mohammad Ali Jinnah a.k.a. Quaid-e-Azam and a famous poetry writer Alama Iqbal. However all 4 regions of the country display different culture with their own specialty in food. As, mentioned above chai is used as a dessert in certain areas, mostly it is used as a substitute to coffee made out of tea with milk and sugar added with some water. Once their favorite sports was ground hockey, however now cricket is a lot more popular than any other sports.

    • Haroon Chaudhary says:

      The Indus valley region, which covers most of Pakistan, has been a part of several successive ancient cultures. The cultures include Neolithic Mehrgarhand the Bronze Age (2800–1800 BCE) at Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro. During the medieval period of now Pakistan is defined as the rise and spread of Islam. During that period the Sufis played a great role in converting majority of Buddhist and Hindus to Islam.

  3. Haroon Chaudhary says:

    Pakistan got its independence after hard work of it leader, and sacrifice of the people who can still be found in the history books. The country is based on 4 different regions which mostly speak 4 different languages. The most amount of work was done by the leader behind Mohammad Ali Jinnah a.k.a. Quaid-e-Azam and a famous poetry writer Alama Iqbal. However all 4 regions of the country display different culture with their own specialty in food. As, mentioned above chai is used as a dessert in certain areas, mostly it is used as a substitute to coffee made out of tea with milk and sugar added with some water. Once their favorite sports was ground hockey, however now cricket is a lot more popular than any other sports. The Indus valley region, which covers most of Pakistan, has been a part of several successive ancient cultures. The cultures include Neolithic Mehrgarhand the Bronze Age (2800–1800 BCE) at Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro. During the medieval period of now Pakistan is defined as the rise and spread of Islam. During that period the Sufis played a great role in converting majority of Buddhist and Hindus to Islam.

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